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Top articles of October 2014



Bee By born1945 via Flickr

Bees proved they continue to be a favourite among the British public, with findings of the Great British Bee Count becoming our most popular article of October 2014.

Great British Bee Count: allotments better than parks for bees

Ilaria Bertini: Findings of the Great British Bee Count revealed that allotments, more than gardens, school grounds and parks provide the best habitat for declining bees, honey bees and bumblebees. Read more.

Finding the right balance between nature conservation and fisheries management – who will pull the strings?

Contributor: While our oceans are under threat, important decisions must be made over the management of fisheries and Marine Protected Areas in European Seas, write Hanna Paulomäki and Magnus Eckeskog from marine conservation group Oceana. But will nature conservation directors have equal input to fisheries leaders, or will economic concerns prevail in talks held behind closed doors? Read more.

Plants absorbing more carbon than previously thought

Tom Revell: Scientists may have underestimated the beneficial impact plants have had while absorbing carbon out of the atmosphere, according to a new study. However, experts have warned that the finding will make little difference to future climate change. Read more.

90% of CEOs believe businesses should have a social purpose

Ilaria Bertini: A survey led by Coca-Cola Enterprises has found that nine out of ten CEOs believe companies should fully integrate sustainability into their business, with future leaders showing more willingness to employ corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices. Read more.

Governments have failed to protect wildlife, UN biodiversity report finds

Ilaria Bertini: As representatives from around the world gather in South Korea to discuss conservation progress, a damning new report from the UN has revealed that governments have failed to tackle the loss of species, habitat destruction, pollution and overfishing. Read more.

Photo: born1945 via Flickr


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