#COP21: Climate Analytics, why 1.5°C? Science, impacts and risks

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Scientists at Climate Analytics have published a body of work on the feasibility of 1.5 degrees. In this section they answer why 1.5°C? Science, impacts and risks. Republished with their kind permission. Read the whole body of work here.

1.5°C risks and feasibility – key points

This fact sheet provides key points on risks to ecosystems, food security and sustainable development associated with 1.5°C warming. It also provides responses to arguments commonly made against 1.5°C and provides the scientific evidence for each point made.

How hot is too hot?

This blog explains the process and outcomes of the Structured Expert Dialogue (SED). It summarises the SEDkey messages and discusses consequences for the negotiations process.

Is it possible to return warming to below 1.5˚C within this century?

This briefing comments on the feasibility of holding warming below 1.5°C within this century and provides information on selected climate risks at 1.5°C, 2°C and 4°C warming.

Climate Impacts at 1.5°C and 2°C – A Pacific Perspective

This one-pager summaries the key climatic risks for the Pacific region at 1.5°C and 2°C warming.

Impacts of climate change on Pacific Islands – A Science Update

This briefing paper summarises the knowledge on impacts of climate change for the Pacific region.

External resources:

The report of the Structured Expert Dialogue

This link will take you to the full report of the Structured Expert Dialogue.

Turn Down the Heat – Climate Extremes, Regional Impacts and the Case for Resilience

This link takes you to the World Bank´s report on climate impacts in Sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia and South-East Asia. Each regional chapter provides a table comparing impacts at 1.5°C, 2°C and 4°C warming.

Turn Down the Heat – Confronting the New Climate Normal

This link takes you to the World Bank´s report on climate impacts in Latin America and the Caribbean, Middle East and North Africa and Europe and Central Asia. Each regional chapter provides a table comparing impacts at 1.5°C, 2°C and 4°C warming.