Monday 24th October 2016                 Change text size:

Most popular on Blue Green 27 Nov – 03 Dec 2015


Here’s the articles that were read by most people in the last week.

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#COP21: Belgium Wins Fossil Of The Day Award At The Paris Climate Summit

On the very first day of the Paris climate summit, Belgium won the shameful Fossil of the Day Award. The dubious award was handed down to Belgium for stumbling on internal divisions, which is blocking its climate action.

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BBC Investigation Uncovers Evidence Of Bribery At British American Tobacco

Panorama has exposed British American Tobacco plc (BAT) for illegally paying politicians and civil servants in countries in East Africa. The payments were revealed when a whistleblower shared hundreds of secret documents with the programme.

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#COP21: Massive Advertising Takeover Campaign In Paris Highlights Corporate Stranglehold

Over 600 artworks critiquing the corporate takeover of the COP21 climate talks were installed in advertising spaces across Paris last night – ahead of the United Nations summit beginning this Monday.

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International Push For Moratorium On New Coal Mines

World renowned scientists and economists back Kiribati President’s call for No New Coal Mines in open letter published tomorrow in The Guardian UK and global edition of New Scientist.

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#COP21: Nearly 1.8 Million People Demand Climate Action In Global Faith-Based Petitions

A total of 1,780,528 million people worldwide have put their names to a collection of faith-based petitions urging political leaders at the COP21 climate summit to take decisive action to curb global warming and deliver a strong, fair deal that helps poor countries adapt to their changing climate.

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And this has been going wild since 9th October: BP Great Australian Bight oil spill could impact all southern Australia’s coast

An oil spill in the Great Australian Bight from a deep-sea well blowout would be devastating for fisheries and marine life, according to new independent oil spill modelling commissioned by the Wilderness Society.

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