Monday 24th October 2016                 Change text size:

Two months until National Ethical Investment Week 2013


National Ethical Investment Week (NEIW) – the event that brings together investors, financial advisers, fund managers, charities, faith groups and more, with the aim of raising the profile of ethical, responsible and sustainable investment – is back for another year in just under two months’ time (October 13-19).

In our four and three-month countdowns to this year’s NEIW, we heard from the organisers, the UK Sustainable Investment and Finance Association (UKSIF), and the sponsors, Ecclesiastical Investment Management and CCLA, respectively.

This time, with two months to go until the event kicks off, we’ve spoken to five financial advisers about what they’re hoping for from the sixth annual edition in October.

All five advisers already give specialist advice on sustainable, responsible, ethical or green investment – but the vast majority of their peers often neglect to even offer their clients such options.

Click here to read The Guide to Sustainable Investment 2013

Therefore, Blue & Green Tomorrow is looking for a number of diverse financial advisers, paraplanners and networks heads to participate in a one-day sustainable investment deep-dive in September. The bootcamp will involve taking sceptical advisers through the world of sustainable investment and then sharing the results with the industry and investors.

This free, invitation-only event will be tailored for those who have an interest in sustainable investment, but do not feel they have sufficient insight to advise clients on the subject.

If you’d like to know more, see here (spaces are strictly limited so please register your interest early to avoid disappointment).

Julian Parrott, Ethical Futures (Edinburgh)

What he’s hoping for in NEIW 2013: An opportunity to move the discussion on from the ‘do ethical funds under/overperform’ debate to positioning how ethical and socially responsible investments sits in the process of financial planning and holistic advice.

Thoughts on NEIW: It’s an important event but it’s very much a case that what you get out of it very much relates to what you put in.

Ian Green, Green Financial Advice (London)

What he’s hoping for in NEIW 2013: Greater awareness for the public that ethical investing does not mean lower returns.

Thoughts on NEIW: [Last year, it gave me] a warm fuzzy feeling that the message was slowly spreading and the fond hope my participation may have helped that in a small way.

Jeremy Newbegin, The Ethical Partnership (the south, Midlands & Yorkshire)

What he’s hoping for in NEIW 2013: Obviously that more people will be aware of the opportunities available through ethical investing, both in terms of doing something positive with their money and achieving a decent return in the long-term.

Thoughts on NEIW: It’s about creating more awareness and that is not necessarily tangible immediately.

Helen Tandy, Gaeia (north-west)

What she’s hoping for in NEIW 2013: To be able to reach out to the many investors who have an interest in or are concerned about the environment, fair trade, organic and sustainable products and employment welfare issues.

Thoughts on NEIW: We always use the week to reach out to existing clients, potential new clients and other advisers through our work with UKSIF and the EIA, and  to raise awareness of ethical and environmental investment.

Lee Smythe, Smythe & Walter Chartered Financial Planners (London & Kent)

What he’s hoping for in NEIW 2013: For investments, I still think that there is overall poor awareness of the availability of solutions which would be more in tune with peoples’ other life choices. I hope that this year’s NEIW continues to enlighten people as to the alternatives they could consider.

Thoughts on NEIW: Last year’s NEIW was a good opportunity to reach out to clients to speak to them about something which would potentially be new to them and to gauge their appetite for taking more account of their general life views with their investment holdings.

Further reading:

The light triad within ethical, sustainable and responsible investment

The dark triad within unethical, unsustainable and irresponsible investment

There is a disconnect between investment and the real world

Ethical investors are not tree huggers, but air breathers (and responsible global citizens)

The Guide to Sustainable Investment 2013

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