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5 Best Ecotourism Destinations

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Is your idea of the perfect trip one where you have the opportunity to get up close and personal with nature? If so, then you may be an eco-adventurer. There are many destinations that make ideal travel spots for ecotourism. From a colourful coral reef and the fabulous fjords to the lush jungles and sprawling savannas, these five regions that encompass some of the world’s most distinctive ecosystems. It’s not enough for a destination to be blessed with natural resources. It’s also important that the resources are cared for. These five destinations have their own unique biodiversity and the local community has a commitment to maintaining the integrity and beauty of the area through sustainable tourism. Remember as a visitor you must do your part. The areas that offer the most ecological diversity are also some of the most threatened regions of the world. If you choose to visit, make sure you follow our green travel tips to ensure the places you visit remain unspoiled, so that their beauty can last for years to come and provide pleasure to other visitors. Palau The island nation is Palau is known as the world’s foremost diving destination. Its popularity goes back long before it was featured on the 10th season of “Survivor”. The crystal clear sea provides a colourful underwater wonderland. There are more than 500 species of coral in Palau’s waters and 1,400 types of fish. On land, a traveller can trek into the dense jungle or spend the day wandering along the unspoiled beach. Palau is located in the westernmost corner of Micronesia. Its remote location has shielded its natural resources and kept mass tourism from affecting the cultural traditions of the locals. The local population works to ensure this island paradise stays pristine. Approximately 460 miles of lagoon waters and reefs are no-fishing zones. This has allowed many of the endangered fish species to repopulate the area. Almost two dozen protected areas are managed by the Palau Conservation Society. They encourage sustainable development in order to defend the Palau’s fragile ecosystem. Norwegian Fjords With snow-capped mountains, crystal clear water and tumbling waterfalls, the famous Norwegian Fjords are known for their pristine beauty. Their strict environment regulations and remote locations have preserved the Fjords, which is one of the region's most well-known natural attraction. The Fjords is home to many fishing villages, where local cultural traditions continue to thrive after hundreds of years. There is a wide variety or wildlife including porpoises, seals, eagles, and seabirds. A visitor to the Fjords may enjoy a scenic boat ride through the fjords or a hike or bike through rugged terrain. Norway is an international leader in environmental policy. Norway has used regulations to control whaling, fishing, sealing and petroleum industries, in order to protect its coastline. Costa Rica There’s a good reason why Cost Rica is synonymous with the term “ecotourism”. Costa Rica has black sand beaches, rushing river rapids, misty cloud forests, and thick rain forests that offer the nature enthusiast, as well as the active travellers the opportunity for a number of outdoor activities. Costa Rica is home to a vast array of creatures including sloths, jaguars, poison dart frogs, sea turtles, monkeys, and crocodiles. Most of these animals live in Costa Rica’s numerous national parks. The country is well-known for its animal and plant diversity, as well as the proliferation of wildlife refuges. The Costa Rican Tourism Institute can help if you’d like to stay in eco-friendly accommodations. They maintain a list of green resorts, hotels, and lodges. Nicaragua Nicaragua has been synonymous with eco-tourism even before the term was a commonly known one. The colonial capital of Leon is home to a whole host of fantastic sites, while Lake Nicaragua is a place full of history and also showcases the areas colonial past. Nicaragua is one of the oldest European areas in the Americas and also one of the best to see the old world charm on the new continent. Other fantastic sustainable places to see include the Masaya Volcano National Park, where one can see inside an active crater and can enjoy the park’s beauty. It’s the perfect Nicaragua vacation. Kerala, India Kerala is a small state of the southwestern coast of India. It’s sometimes referred to as “God’s Own Country”. This is a label that you may soon use after visiting its lush virgin forests and clean sandy beaches. As one of India’s most unspoiled corners, Kerala is home to hundreds of unique animal species. Nearly one-quarter of the county’s 10,000 plant species are located in Kerala. This is the home to the nilgiri tahr, an endangered mountain goat that lives in Rajmala National Park. In the Lake Periyar Wildlife Sanctuary, bison, wild boars, and elephants roam free. Kerala’s ecosystem had been threatened in the past by excessive foresting. However, the state’s farms are now protected. Tourism officials are also encouraging environmentally responsible travel to Kerala.

Is your idea of the perfect trip one where you have the opportunity to get up close and personal with nature? If so, then you may be an eco-adventurer. There are many destinations that make ideal travel spots for ecotourism. From a colourful coral reef and the fabulous fjords to the lush jungles and sprawling savannas, these five regions that encompass some of the world’s most distinctive ecosystems.

It’s not enough for a destination to be blessed with natural resources. It’s also important that the resources are cared for. These five destinations have their own unique biodiversity and the local community has a commitment to maintaining the integrity and beauty of the area through sustainable tourism.


Remember as a visitor you must do your part. The areas that offer the most ecological diversity are also some of the most threatened regions of the world. If you choose to visit, make sure you follow our green travel tips to ensure the places you visit remain unspoiled, so that their beauty can last for years to come and provide pleasure to other visitors.

Palau

The island nation is Palau is known as the world’s foremost diving destination. Its popularity goes back long before it was featured on the 10th season of “Survivor”. The crystal clear sea provides a colourful underwater wonderland. There are more than 500 species of coral in Palau’s waters and 1,400 types of fish. On land, a traveller can trek into the dense jungle or spend the day wandering along the unspoiled beach.

Palau is located in the westernmost corner of Micronesia. Its remote location has shielded its natural resources and kept mass tourism from affecting the cultural traditions of the locals. The local population works to ensure this island paradise stays pristine.


Approximately 460 miles of lagoon waters and reefs are no-fishing zones. This has allowed many of the endangered fish species to repopulate the area. Almost two dozen protected areas are managed by the Palau Conservation Society. They encourage sustainable development in order to defend the Palau’s fragile ecosystem.

Norwegian Fjords

With snow-capped mountains, crystal clear water and tumbling waterfalls, the famous Norwegian Fjords are known for their pristine beauty. Their strict environment regulations and remote locations have preserved the Fjords, which is one of the region’s most well-known natural attraction. The Fjords is home to many fishing villages, where local cultural traditions continue to thrive after hundreds of years.

There is a wide variety or wildlife including porpoises, seals, eagles, and seabirds. A visitor to the Fjords may enjoy a scenic boat ride through the fjords or a hike or bike through rugged terrain.

Norway is an international leader in environmental policy. Norway has used regulations to control whaling, fishing, sealing and petroleum industries, in order to protect its coastline.

Costa Rica

There’s a good reason why Cost Rica is synonymous with the term “ecotourism”. Costa Rica has black sand beaches, rushing river rapids, misty cloud forests, and thick rain forests that offer the nature enthusiast, as well as the active travellers the opportunity for a number of outdoor activities.

Costa Rica is home to a vast array of creatures including sloths, jaguars, poison dart frogs, sea turtles, monkeys, and crocodiles. Most of these animals live in Costa Rica’s numerous national parks. The country is well-known for its animal and plant diversity, as well as the proliferation of wildlife refuges.

The Costa Rican Tourism Institute can help if you’d like to stay in eco-friendly accommodations. They maintain a list of green resorts, hotels, and lodges.

Nicaragua

Nicaragua has been synonymous with eco-tourism even before the term was a commonly known one. The colonial capital of Leon is home to a whole host of fantastic sites, while Lake Nicaragua is a place full of history and also showcases the areas colonial past.

Nicaragua is one of the oldest European areas in the Americas and also one of the best to see the old world charm on the new continent.

Other fantastic sustainable places to see include the Masaya Volcano National Park, where one can see inside an active crater and can enjoy the park’s beauty. It’s the perfect Nicaragua vacation.

Kerala, India

Kerala is a small state of the southwestern coast of India. It’s sometimes referred to as “God’s Own Country”. This is a label that you may soon use after visiting its lush virgin forests and clean sandy beaches.

As one of India’s most unspoiled corners, Kerala is home to hundreds of unique animal species. Nearly one-quarter of the county’s 10,000 plant species are located in Kerala. This is the home to the nilgiri tahr, an endangered mountain goat that lives in Rajmala National Park. In the Lake Periyar Wildlife Sanctuary, bison, wild boars, and elephants roam free.

Kerala’s ecosystem had been threatened in the past by excessive foresting. However, the state’s farms are now protected. Tourism officials are also encouraging environmentally responsible travel to Kerala.

 

Environment

Want to Connect With Nature? Start by Disconnecting From Busyness

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Connect With Nature

Have you ever found yourself staring at one of your (many) devices and feeling slightly disgusted with how much time you waste on technology? If so, you aren’t alone. We all have moments like these and it’s important that we use them as motivation to change – especially if we want to be more connected with nature.

How Busyness Impacts Your Connection With Nature

Whether you realize it or not, you live an ultra connected life. Between smart phones, tablets, computers, and wearable devices, you’re never very far from some sort of technology that can connect you to the internet or put you in touch with other people. That’s just the world we live in.


While it could be argued that this sort of omnipresent connectivity is a positive thing, it’s also pretty clear that being permanently tethered to technology impacts our ability to strip away distractions and connect with nature.

When you’re always within arm’s reach of a device, you feel a sense of busyness.  Whether it’s browsing your social media feed, uploading a picture, reading the news, or responding to an email, there’s always something to do. As someone who wants to spend more time in nature, this is problematic.

4 Practical Ways to Disconnect

If you want to truly connect with nature and live a greener lifestyle, you have to be proactive about finding ways to disconnect. Here are a few practical suggestions:

1. Switch to a New Phone Plan

It’s not always practical to totally unplug from the world. Family and work responsibilities mean you can’t go off the grid and continue to fulfill your responsibilities. Having said that, there are some ways to scale back.


One suggestion is to switch to a prepaid phone plan. When you have a prepaid phone plan, you’re far less likely to spend hours and hours of your time making phone calls, sending texts, and surfing the web. It forces you to be more conscious of what you’re doing.

2. Get Rid of Social Media

Social media is one of the biggest time wasters for most people. Whether you realize it or not, it’s also a huge stressor. You’re constantly being exposed to the best snapshots of everyone else’s lives, which makes you feel like you’re missing out on something (even when you aren’t).

If you want to feel a sense of relief and free yourself up to spend more time in nature, get rid of social media. Don’t just delete the apps off your phone – actually disable your accounts. It’s a bold, yet necessary step.

3. Create Quiet Hours

If you aren’t able to get rid of social media and disable various online accounts, the next best thing you can do is establish quiet hours each day where you totally detach from technology. You should do this for a minimum of three hours per day for best results.

4. Build Community

Do you know why we’re drawn to social media and our devices? Whether consciously or subconsciously, it’s because we all want to be connected to other people. But do you know what’s better than connecting with people online? Connecting with them in person.

As you build real life, person-to-person relationships, you’ll feel less of a need to constantly have your eyes glued to a screen. Connect with other people who have an appreciation for nature and bond over your mutual interests.

Untether Your Life

If you find yourself constantly connected to a device, then this is probably a clear indicator that you aren’t living your best life. You certainly aren’t enjoying any sort of meaningful connection with nature. Now’s as good a time as any to untether your life and explore what a world free from cords, screens, and batteries is really like.

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Environment

6 Tips for an Eco-Friendly Move

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Moving can be a stressful and challenging time. No matter how many times you’ve done it in the past, the process of packing up, transporting, and unpacking isn’t very fun. It’s also not very eco-friendly. As you prepare for your next move, there are things you can do to ensure you leave less of a footprint behind.

6 Tips for a Greener Move

Because of the stress and pressure felt when moving, it’s pretty common for people to rush through the process and focus on getting it done. In fact, a lot of people take an “at all costs” approach; they’ll do whatever it takes to make the process as cheap and fast as possible. Don’t be one of those people. It doesn’t take much effort to turn a standard move into an eco-friendly move.


1. Maximize Each Trip

When moving across town, it’s imperative that you make as few trips as possible. Each trip requires more gas, more emissions, and more waste, and more time.

If you’re taking your personal vehicle, consider pulling a trailer behind it. You’d be surprised how much stuff you can fit into a small trailer. Not only will it make your move greener, but it’ll also save you a lot of time.

2. Donate Things You Don’t Want to Keep

The longer you live somewhere, the more junk you accumulate. This isn’t always obvious until you start packing for a big move. Instead of bringing all of these things with you to your next home, get rid of the stuff you don’t need! If the items are useful, donate them. If the items don’t have much value, toss them.

3. Reuse Moving Boxes

Not only are moving boxes expensive, but they’re also wasteful. If you need a bunch of cardboard boxes, consider looking around on Craigslist, asking friends, or checking the dumpsters behind stores. You can usually find a bunch of recycled boxes of all different shapes and sizes. Here are 12 places you can get them for free.


4. Get Creative With Packing

Who says you need moving boxes? You may find that it’s possible to do most of your move without all that cardboard. Things like storage containers, trashcans, filing cabinets, buckets, and dressers can all store items. Blankets and sheets can be used in lieu of bubble wrap to prevent your items from getting damaged.

5. Use Green Cleaning Supplies

Once you arrive at your new place, resist the urge to pull out a bunch of harsh chemicals to clean the place. You can do yourself (and the planet) a favor by using green cleaning supplies instead. Ingredients like vinegar, baking soda, and ammonia are great to start with.

6. Forward Your Mail ASAP

Don’t delay in forwarding your mail from your previous address to your new one. Not only is it wasteful for the Postal Service to route your mail to a place where you don’t live, but the next owner is probably just going to toss your letters in the trash.

Moving Doesn’t Have to be Wasteful

Most people only move once every few years. Some people will go a decade or more without a move. As a result, the process of moving often feels strange and new. The less experience you have with it, the less likely it is that you’ll be as efficient as you should. But instead of just diving into the process blind, take some time to learn about what an eco-friendly move looks like. That way, you can leave behind the smallest footprint possible.

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