Saturday 22nd October 2016                 Change text size:

Blue & Green Daily: Thursday 11 September headlines

newspaper arm by sanja gjenero via stock.xchng

Blue & Green Daily finds and summarises the top sustainability stories around the web every morning. We start with our own picks from Blue & Green Tomorrow.

Europe’s climate change and energy strategy at ‘critical juncture’, says thinktank

Smart meters could save only 2% on energy bills, MPs warn

Oxfordshire named ‘Social Enterprise Place’ ahead of Social Saturday

UK carbon budgets will boost GDP and make households £565 richer

University of California unsure over fossil fuel divestment


11 September headlines

Climate scepticism still rife among Tory MPs – poll

Climate scepticism is still rife among the Tory parliamentary party, according to a new poll of MPs. More than twice as many Conservative MPs as Labour MOs who responded to the poll cast doubt on scientists have “conclusively proved” climate change is caused by humans. Guardian.

Ozone layer showing ‘signs of recovery’, UN says

The ozone layer that shields the earth from cancer-causing ultraviolet rays is showing early signs of thickening after years of depletion, a UN study says. The ozone hole that appears annually over Antarctica has stopped growing bigger every year. BBC.

Organic coffee threatened by global warming-stoked fungus

Organic coffee growers faces losses as they look to save their livelihoods while avoiding chemical solutions as leaf-rust fungus, which can devastate crops, is benefiting because of the impacts of global warming. Bloomberg.

RBS and Lloyds to flee Scotland if country votes for independence

The Royal Bank of Scotland has said it has plans to move the bank’s holding company, if Scotland votes for independence. The announcement confirms that RBS, a major employer in the country, could move its base, following its state-backed peer, Lloyds. Telegraph.

Tropical forests illegally destroyed for commercial agriculture

Increasing international demand for palm oil, beef, soy and wood is fuelling the illegal destruction of tropical forests at an alarming rate, according to new analysis that suggests nearly half of all recent tropical deforestation is the result of unlawful clearing for commercial agriculture. Guardian.


Interesting picks

Will cutting carbon emissions save the UK money? – Guardian

Scottish people being misled over oil and gas reserves – Telegraph

Six things to know about the climate change summit happening in New York this month – The Carbon Brief

Adapting to climate change can’t be left to the wild west of the markets – Guardian

Photo: Sanja gjenero via Freeimages

There are currently no comments.

Register with Blue and Green

To leave a comment on this article, fill in your details below to register, alternatively if you are already registered you can login here

Subscribe for our Newsletter

Time limit is exhausted. Please reload CAPTCHA.

A password will be e-mailed to you.