Thursday 21st August 2014                 Change text size:

Organic September: facing the future



Photo: Robert Couse-Baker via Flickr

Organic September is almost over, but that shouldn’t signal the end of your commitment to organic and sustainable food, farming and land-use. Far from it.

We began our coverage of the Soil Association’s celebration of all things organic by defining what organic actually means, and we came to the conclusion that it means food, farming and land-use that is, quite simply, better. Better for the farmer, better for the environment and better for you.

Once this definition had been instilled, we looked at enabling change: how you can really make a difference when it comes to buying organic food. We outlined some of the groups you can join, and explained where to look to check if shops, products and restaurants share your commitment to all things organic.

Then, last week, we examined the notion of good food for all – how to get organic, sustainable food and farming out to as wide an audience as possible. Schools, nurseries and hospitals are just three of the places that have been targeted by the Soil Association to adopt better food, and many are seeing the intrinsic benefits to this new way of working already.

So where do we go from here?

Well, if you’ve indulged yourself in organic food this month, why not carry on until next month? And the month after that. And the month after that. If you haven’t realised it already, food that is sustainable tastes better, is healthier and leaves almost no footprint on the planet.

It’s often that these three areas are satisfied, so it’d be foolish not to snap up the opportunity whilst it’s presented to you.

‘Facing the future’ is the sub-heading to this, the fourth and final Organic September feature on Blue & Green Tomorrow, and when we do this, we see sustainable food industries, widespread sustainable farming and as a result, consumers that are healthier, happier and more content with what they’re eating. It’s about enjoying your food without costing the Earth.

Organic September may have come and gone. But there’s no reason why its impact can’t continue indefinitely.

Further reading:

Organic September: good food for all

Organic September: enabling change

Organic September: what is organic?

Soil Association set for month-long celebration of organic food


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