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Keeping Potential Buyers Interested in Your Green Home

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Selling a home is never going to be easy. It can be even more difficult if you are selling a green home. While green homes are the next big thing for a lot of people, a lot of others aren’t interested in paying more to do their part in protecting the environment.

You may be able to keep people interested in your green home in markets where green living is a huge trend. San Francisco, Washington D.C. and Boston are some of the cities with the strongest focus on green living. You won’t have a hard time getting potential buyers there.

It will be tougher if you are trying to reach customers in a lot of other markets. Here are some things to consider.

Pragmatic Variables to Focus on While Selling a Green House

The concept of selling home comes with challenges but with a proper planning and guidance, this can be achieved with great satisfaction.

When you are on a hunt to buy a new home for yourself but not before selling your own place, there is so much to do – listings, documentation, meeting prospective buyers and while doing all this, you might have to move to your new home. In such a situation, you may run out of money for the improvements of your old home and cannot arrange time & funds for the repairs. This means you must be selling home as is. This might lead to a delay in the selling process.

For those desperate times, here are some handy tips the seller can follow to keep buyers interested in their home, even if it is up for sale as is:

Disclosures are a mandate when you are selling home as is

The formal contracts frequently use the word “as is”. It is in the best interest of both, the seller and the buyer to emphasize on this so that there is no later case of disagreement. “What you see is what you get” theory is fair enough, but state law mandates a complete disclosure when you are selling home as is. A licensed home inspector is in charge of preparing a report for the buyer, which would clearly mention all the visible and not-so-visible problems of the home.

Be aware of the competition

Competition makes you aware of your strengths and weaknesses. Instead of pricing your home blindly, try to tour as many comparable homes as possible. Check for the prices they are asking with the kind of home condition and amenities they offer. You may have to lower your asking price based on what else is on the market.

Plan to combat lowball offers

Who all would be attracted to your “as is home”? Mostly, investors, contractors, first time buyers with a low budget and house flippers. Everyone is looking for the best deal possible so you should be ready for some low (and sometimes, very low) price offers. That moment might anger you, but a pre-prepared swift counteroffer can save you any heated argument and you may end up coming halfway to seal a deal.

Keep the home clean, totally

There is a visible difference between an old house and an unclean house. A clean old house never deflects the potential buyers. As soon as your listing is up, make sure to keep your home clean and welcoming for viewers at all times. You should mow the front lawn, make your bed, and attend to all the little daily chores that sometimes get pushed off.

Selling home as is does not mean you stop bothering about some priority minimum repairs. After all, it is your home first and it tells a lot about you as its owner. So why not show yourself as considerate homeowners and make some precedent repairs like leaking roofs, bare minimum violations, heating or air conditioning system, hole & big cracks in the ceiling and walls, broken doors or windows. Understand the buyer’s side as well, because someday, you may be in their shoes.

Selling a Green Home Won’t Be Difficult

Selling a green home sounds difficult. Fortunately, it will be a lot easier if you have the right message. Remember that not all buyers are intersted in virtue signaling about the benefits of green living. You need to focus on other factors, such as tidyness and cost.

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