Friday 28th October 2016                 Change text size:

#GE2015: Still unsure on who to vote for?

Polling station By Martin Bamford via Flickr

After months and months of electioneering many voters are still unsure on who to vote for. Fear not, Blue & Green Tomorrow is here to hold your hand through the most keenly fought election in twenty years.

Reading our Guide to Sustainable Democracy might shed some light, as a starter for ten.

Who are my candidates? You can find your local constituency here and get an objective take on the constituency profile here.

What’s the state of the polls nationally and locally? You can see the national Poll-of-Polls here and get a more Scottish focus here. Lord Ashcroft has polled 167 marginal constituencies (of 650) and you can find those results here.

I still don’t know who to vote for: There are two leading tools that can help you decide how to vote, Vote for Policies and Vote Match – both with over 700,000 people participating. Vote for Policies has an excellent open data section, which allows you to dig through country, constituency and policy results.

I support the Greens (a recent poll says 33% of our readers do) but don’t have a candidate: Labour and the Greens have different policies and they stand against each other. But many of their supporters share similar values. And if they have one thing in common it is not wanting to wake up after the election to a Conservative prime minister. Vote Swap lets you pledge to swap your vote.

I’m thinking of voting tactically to get the Prime Minister I want: The Guardian says, “We’re heading for a hung parliament where neither Ed Miliband nor David Cameron will get a majority in this week’s general election. Polls suggest that a remarkable level of people are now considering voting tactically in order to boost the chances of their favoured party forming a government. But deciding how to vote tactically is a risky process. Here “is a rough no-guarantees guide to tactical voting.”

If you want to place a plague on all their houses then vote ‘None of the Above’. As there is no ‘None of the Above’ box on the ballot in this UK election:  write NONE across your ballot paper, and put a single line through all the boxes. Here’s why and how.

But most of all vote. Polling stations open between 7am and 10pm. With record numbers registered to vote don’t leave it until the last minute.

Photo: Martin Bamford via Flickr

Further reading:

#GE2015: Will Northern Ireland Vote for Policies?


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